Diesel Additives

Diesel Additives

What and Why do you use it????

JoeandMarcia
24 February 2011
08:59 AM
I know diesel owners use an additive in the "colder" areas to prevent jelling, but do you use an additive every fill up?  Once a month, 3 months, year?

What is the reason for adding an additive? After all doesn't it get everything when it is processed?

LindaH
24 February 2011
09:51 AM
Colder areas should already have "winter" diesel in their pumps that doesn't gel up.

We got stuck in Washington State this past year until December 6.  We had LOTS of snow and temperatures that were below zero on a few days. We never added anything to our diesel fuel and never had a problem with it gelling.

Barbaraok
24 February 2011
10:50 AM
Never add anything except fresh fuel; always fuel up if stopping for more than a couple of weeks.  Cummins says nothing else is needed.
Barb
BrianT
24 February 2011
11:02 AM
I use this: XPD Formula in every tank.
Brian
richfaa
24 February 2011
11:10 AM
We use additive in our 08 6.4L Ford Diesel.  We use it because Ford recommends that we do.  Yes we know it is reported that the additives are added by the distributor but there is no guarantee that is true.  The new motors require a cetane rating of 45 and many brands do not meet that requirement.  There is also the question of the motor being properly lubricated.  To me it is a small price to be safe.  No we do not purchase the additive from Ford. We use diesel Kleen.

If your brand truck says it is not required then I would not use it.

AFChap
24 February 2011
12:00 PM
I use a moisture reducer or algaecide, and add it only when the rig will be sitting for a month or so, added when I fill the tank just before parking it.

Fresh fuel does have what it needs.  Aging fuel that gets moisture/water condensation in it can develop problems.  Good diesel discipline is to park (extended periods) with fuel tank full when possible, and carry extra fuel filters.

Bill & Marg
24 February 2011
12:28 PM
Our RV sits from Dec 1 to March 1 in our driveway & I follow just as AFChap describes & include an anti-gel.  I picked up the additive at a local truck repair shop & follow what truckers do in our area.
Bill
MT_Flyfisher
24 February 2011
12:35 PM
I also used an additive in '08 F450 for pretty much the same reasons as you, although I must have overlooked reading that Ford recommended it.  I used Ford's cetane booster and multipurpose additive in every fill up.  I have a 2011 F350 on order right now, and intend to continue adding this same additive.

I never compared my mpg without the additive, but I did get better mpg on my truck than what I'd heard many others were getting, so at least I felt comfortable that the additive did not hurt my fuel economy

h2guy
24 February 2011
12:38 PM
I've got 260k on my dually w/o ever using an additive.  Never saw a need for it.  In the past I've noticed some posters recommending an additive and then later posting a complaint about fuel prices.  No mention about their self-imposed price increase per gal that comes with their use of the additives.
nosticks
24 February 2011
12:53 PM
In answer to your original question as to why additives.  When diesel is produced it has everything it needs as you suggested.  The problem is storage.  Diesel is susceptible to forming an algae, but needs moisture in the tank for that to happen.  Either your tank or the suppliers tank are subject to condensation and can provide the necessary moisture to kick off the process.  You can tell if this is happening by inspecting your fuel filters.  Any black slime oozing from them at change time or if you have see through Racor filters it is easy to detect at the onset.

That all said, the use of a biocide such as Bio-Diesel is a preventative measure is not a bad idea if you suspect you will be going through climatological changes that encourage condensation and particularly if you are going to sit for months of inactivity.  I used it in my Cruising Trawler always, as I was operating in that type of environment.  It took one bout of algae to make me a believer, and once started it is difficult to disperse.  It will take many filter changes back to back including the use of a biocide to eliminate it. So it becomes a choice, but I don't see it as
much of a consideration under normal highway operation where fuel is continually turned over both by the supplier and your own usage.  If I had a 200-300 gal. tank and I was going to sit somewhere for months through a seasonal change, I would add biocide just to be on the safe side.

Wandering1
24 February 2011
12:56 PM
Many diesel engines require an additive be added to the radiator to prevent holes from being bored thru the engine block due to the cavitation in the water.  Check with your engine manufacturer or go to a big truck (HDT) parts store or dealer parts department for the additive.  This has always been a problem with the Ford power stroke engines I have owned since 1996. Not surprisingly, some Ford dealerships were not even aware of the requirement but would not replace the engines under warranty with holes in the engine block because the additive in the radiator was not maintained by the owner. Test kits are also available to tell you when to add the additive.

I have never used a diesel additive for the fuel nor have I ever needed it.

TBC
24 February 2011
02:42 PM
I can assure you that the diesel in the cold area DO NOT always have all they need.  I hauled trailers across the US and Canada and was shutdown 3 times because of GELLED fuel problems.  Not only me but also dozens of big trucks.  In Ft Wayne, IN one time there were so many shutdown that the emergency service companies could not get to them all.

If the fuel has all it needs why is there a product called FUEL 911 made by one of the major additive manufacturers.  It is used to de gel the fuel and it is not an instant thing either.

Once I was driving in SD and the fuel gelled and shut the engine down.  By adding additives and a few gallons and fuel and bleeding the system several times with a boost from a service truck I finally got restarted.  It is not any fun trying to get a diesel started when the fuel is gelled.

DO NOT TRUST THE FUEL SUPPLIERS TO ADD THE ADDITIVES. The fuel does not come from the refinery with the additives.  It is added by the wholesale supplier just like gasoline additives are.  The fuel from the wholesaler is just raw fuel bought for resale at all stations that order the fuel from them, no matter the brand name.

richfaa
24 February 2011
03:07 PM
The manual for the 6.4L says no additives are needed IF the fuel meets ASTM D Industry standards. The proper additives are supposed to be added (cetane, Lubricity) by the jobber.  Cetane levels are rarely posted on the pumps as octane levels are.  These newer diesels run best at 45 Cetane and we may not be getting that at most stations.  Both Ford dealers here in Florida and in Ohio recommended the additive.  The dealer here in Florida had sampled several stations in the area and none of then were over 40 cetane.. The Hess stations here do post a Cetane rating of 40. we asked a couple of tanker drivers who, looked at their invoices and had no mention of Cetane levels.

IMO the motor runs stronger when on the additive. Here in Florida we use Shell premium that is rated at 45 cetane......

Biker56
24 February 2011
03:30 PM
I use 1 oz. per 26 gal of Opti Summer Blend in the summer for lubrication on every fill up & 1 1/2 oz. of Pri-Ocide when putting my full 90 gal tank in storage over the winter and a couple of times over my summer trip.

I may not need to use any of it.  Also I don't want to have any need, to buy a new injector pump either.  Your experience may be different and there is nothing wrong with that.

RayIN
24 February 2011
07:33 PM
Exactly right!  Just proper maintenance and buying from high-volume fuel stations keeps a diesel running smooth and trouble-free. I'm not against others spending money though, it keeps the economy alive
RayIN
24 February 2011
07:36 PM
That higher cetane number means less power than 40 cetane.  It took me a long time to find that information, and I think it was on an Exxon webpage.  Higher cetane number means easier starting in cold weather, less diesel knock, less white smoke. environment.gov pdf
pairajays
25 February 2011
01:12 AM
I always thought that the fuel line separator took out the moisture.
Jim E
vmarr
25 February 2011
01:18 AM
I've used power service in the gray bottle, ( diesel Kleen), in tractors, combines, and every diesel PU I ever had, and now in the KW.  Its got a Cummins in it.  Book says it doesn't recommend or not recommend using additives.  In cold weather, which I try to avoid anymore,  I used the white bottle.  I'm no pro on this stuff, but I didn't use it for about the first 4000 miles I had the truck, then a trucker friend talked me into using it again, and got about 1 to 1 and a half MPG better mileage.  I don't know if it is what did it, but something seemed to help. If you want to  talk mileage improvement ideas, I'm pretty good at that too
VegasFlyer
25 February 2011
02:04 AM
When they wrote moisture, they are referring to moisture created from condensation that will form in any part of the inside portion of the fuel tank(s) that is exposed to air,  (Not Full).  When that happens, the  moisture, combined with the fuel, can propagate algae that will grow in the fuel actually feeding on the fuel.  With enough algae growth, you can wind up with expensive repairs to an injector pump, and/or, injectors.
weldon
25 February 2011
02:59 AM
I use an additive I starter when a Chevrolet. Dealer in CO. told me to after I had some troubler with the EGR valve.
richfaa
25 February 2011
10:05 AM
I note that the study was done in 2004 some time before the new requirements for the newer motors were established.  Could the study be directed toward the older diesel Motors???? and this was done in Australia.

Even so...

"An increase in natural cetane can contribute towards reduced fuel consumption.  To avoid excessive dosage of diesel fuel with cetane additives, the World Wide Fuel Charter (WWFC) recommends that the difference between the cetane index and the cetane number be no greater than 3.2 (Generally large quantities of additive are not added for economic reasons, as the additive is expensive).3  This has also been
general practice to prevent having the general character of the fuel too far from that implied by a certain cetane number. Starting and white smoke emissions appear to be related primarily to ignition delay, and so cetane
improved fuels generally perform as well as natural fuels of the same cetane number.

Oops the above was on MPG

"2.4 Impact on engine performance

Cetane number requirements for diesel vehicles depend on engine design, size, nature of speed and load variations, and on starting and atmospheric conditions.  High cetane number fuels enable an engine to be started
more easily at lower air temperatures, reduce white smoke exhaust, and reduce diesel knock.  With a low cetane number fuel, engine knock noise and white smoke can be observed during engine warm-up, especially in severe cold weather.  If this condition is allowed to continue for any prolonged period, harmful fuel derived deposits will accumulate within the combustion chamber.  While an engine may appear to operate satisfactorily on low cetane number fuel, after prolonged use, severe mechanical damage (e.g. piston erosion) can result.

that does nor sound good???

pairajays
25 February 2011
10:35 AM
Want the moisture settle to the bottom of the tank since water is heaver than diesel?  If it does not settle then the separator would take it out as the fuel is used.  I would think algae couldn't form that quick.  I could envision an algae problem if the MH sits unused for an extended period of time in a cold high humidity area.
Jim E
BrianT
25 February 2011
11:10 AM
Just outta curiosity, will algae grow in a tank that's sloshing around fairly often?

I ask because I often have a good bit of diesel onboard and I may not actually use off of that tank for several months.  But the truck gets used and moved about so it's not as though the tank is sitting there motionless for months at a time.

Or maybe motion doesn't matter?

Just something I wondered about.
Brian

Bob McLean
25 February 2011
11:18 AM
Exactly!  Our eldest daughter is presently driving the 2000 Jetta that we handed over to her a few years back, and when the temperature gets down to the point where it doesn't matter if you're using Fahrenheit or Celsius, you'd better have something in your diesel fuel to keep it from turning to Jell-O.  She learned the hard way after the thing quit on her on the Gardener Expressway (Toronto) a few winters back.  (I think it was around -22C)  ALSO, what a lot of folks don't realize is that you can run up to 20% (I've even heard 25%, but that scares me) straight gasoline in
a full tank of diesel, and that will also keep it from gelling.  Much easier to simply go to an auto supply place and buy a quart/litre of additive and throw it in the tank.  No math involved. No worries for the folks with Motorhomes though, you won't be going anywhere near the Great White North in the winter months, so no need for alarm.
Caseyj
25 February 2011
11:33 AM
When,  I purchased my first diesel truck, it had been sitting on the lot for 4 months.  It was slow to move due to the fact that it was a non-turbo and the new power stroke engines were more in demand.

I wanted to know everything about this truck so I went through the maintenance routine.  When I changed the fuel filter, it was loaded with algae.  It's a substance that looks like soap scum and is very heavy in consistency.  Kind of like a heavy gel. I'm sure that sitting on the dealers lot and the warm Alabama climate contributed to this growth and I can see where it would become a real problem if left unattended.

I also use Power Service or something similar to, to keep this potential problem in check.  A bottle will run you about eight bucks and it will last over many tankfulls.  It also cleans your injectors and provides additional lubricity for your seals in your pump.  Cheap insurance.

RayIN
25 February 2011
07:16 PM
Bob, you may also use kerosene to keep diesel fuel from gelling, safer than using gasoline, cheaper than OTC additives.
JoeandMarcia
25 February 2011
10:32 PM
So we have mixed emotions on to use or not to use,  I didn't read where anyone blew a motor because they did or did not use it, some say you get better MPG.  I guess it all depends on what I (you) want to do, or what the manufacturer says.

Myself I think I will put some in when we head north next month.

Thanks for your responses

RayIN
26 February 2011
07:34 PM
Joe you referred to a very important point.  In the deep South winter additives are not an issue.  You top off your tank then head North into cold weather.  Now, your diesel fuel does not have the anti-gel additives required to prevent a severe headache.  Adding an anti-gel additive is necessary for your scenario.  You might also consider buying a bottle of Diesel Kleen's "Rescue 911" in the bright red bottle, just in case you do encounter fuel jelling
Russ Barnes
26 February 2011
07:49 PM
Joe
Where you were made me hold from posting until you said "heading North".  We live in TN and in 15 years of diesels in VW's and my Excursion (combined over 400,000 miles) we have had gelled fuel once in one of our Jetta's.  I made a mistake and didn't buy fuel at the local truck stop and we had a sudden drop to 11*.  Wife headed to work, called me to come and get it - it stopped.  I have never had gelling in my 6.0 Ford diesel, but one winter I was in Cincinnati and got fuel at a car station that pumped diesel, didn't gel, but the water in fuel light came on.  That was one time in 7 years and 200,000 miles.  I learned what many had told me - in the winter buy fuel at truck stops.  And once or twice I tried some additive, but it was hard to remember so I stopped and never have had
trouble since.  Besides it’s warming up here and even further north, so you may not even have to bother, these problems are usually at 15-20 and colder.
Russ
Deezl Smoke
26 February 2011
10:07 PM
"fuel additives" covers an amazing amount of products and product content.  If you wish to run an "additive", it is important that you know what your reason is for using it and seek the right additive.  Just any ol' additive is truly a waste of money.

Some additives actually do not have anything to do with the combustion process, but instead are designed to perform their duty in the exhaust.  Some are system cleaners, some are fuel stabilizers, etc.

For the most part anymore with the new engines being built to run the ULSD, additives are not as heavily relied upon.  With many of the older diesel engines that were designed to run on "the good stuff," additives are often required or at minimum, additives can show a huge increase in performance and/or reliability when running ULSD. Especially if you have an old rotary pump with brass parts inside.

If you have emission equipment on your engine, often it is best to follow the manufacturers recommends if they say not to use additives. Emission equipment can be very expensive to replace or repair.

For my older diesel engines, I run a simple lubricity additive, Marvel Mystery Oil.

JoeandMarcia
26 February 2011
11:09 PM
NEO/Russ,
Yes I know about the southern fuel going north.  My wife had a diesel car and once it gelled in 20 or lower temps, a warm up in the weather and a drop light under the hood took care of the problem in a couple days.  I hope we don't see any below freezing temps in our future, but I will keep an eye on the extended forecast once we get to KY. (middle march)
Wandering1
26 February 2011
11:15 PM
Now that you have gotten all of these personal opinions, do the smart thing and ask the RV Dealer, Manufacturer and/or the engine manufacturer and get the facts if you really want to know.
pairajays
27 February 2011
10:45 AM
Wandering1,
Ask an RV dealer or manufacturer?  Man that would be the last place I would go. IMO, they don't know diddle about diesel maintenance.  The engine manufacturer is the only way to go.
Jim E
Wandering1
27 February 2011
11:28 AM
I agree.  I tried asking my dealers maintenance mechanics and they didn't have a clue.  I went to an HDT dealer and asked their service dept. tech and got the information I needed about my engine.  The purpose of my reply was to inform the OP that they should start by going to a source that would be more reliable and not ask for personal opinions about something as important as their engine.  If you have a question about your RV, start with the dealer if you don't get the answer you are looking for go to the manufacturer.  If you have a question about your engine,
ask the engine manufacturer.  If you have a question about your transmission,ask the transmission manufacturer.  Many people have important questions that should be answered by subject matter experts and they get lazy and ask questions on internet forums where they get a lot of different personal opinions
Deezl Smoke
27 February 2011
11:37 AM
Wow, is that your personal opinion, or are you a manufacturer to give such advice?
Biker56
27 February 2011
12:21 PM
Diesel Lubricity Additive Test done. Best to the ones that can hurt
A PDF of the above Test

Cetane improver test between 3 additives

richfaa
27 February 2011
01:14 PM
Couple of really good links, had seen those before somewhere.  Should dispel some myths.

Oh, another source of information on if a additive is recommended or needed might be the owners manual on your brand Truck and motor.

Mike2338
04 March 2011
03:20 PM
I work for a major automotive company that does a large diesel share.  While the refineries do have a winter blend that if available will solve most of the cold weather gelling, we are finding an increasing amount of cold weather issues with Bio-Diesel. Some manufacturers allow for up to 20% Bio.  It would be interesting to see an Industry study on the BioDiesel and Cold Weather.
RayIN
04 March 2011
07:52 PM
Power Service, Artic Express biodiesel anti-jell is touted to prevent B20 fuel jelling.  The Ask Ben-biodiesel basics FAQ page addresses biodiesel jelling but is not an Industry Study exactly.
RayIN
05 March 2011
10:37 PM
I've done some internet searching to educate myself more about diesel fuel, its characteristics, and the use of additives.  This led me to change my mind about listening to engine manufacturers for using additives. diesel fuel explained How does cetane rating affect engine performance and cetane in diesel fuel  There are many more websites I didn't take time to read and absorb.

Another fact I did not know is, diesel fuel in Europe and Australia is a much higher quality than North America, which has the worst engine wear rating test results.  My conclusion, I will likely begin using a fuel additive.  Thanks in part to what I have read in this thread too.

Almost forgot; there is yet another alternative diesel fuel in the future: it is not bio-diesel and not petroleum-based diesel fuel

pairajays
05 March 2011
10:58 PM
I don't understand your post.  Are you implying there is some kind of additive that will increase the power of my diesel engine.  We were mostly discussing algae growth.  Or maybe I can add something that will increase the cetane rating of my diesel.  Or maybe increase the lifetime of my engine.  And any or all of these additives are cost effective?
Jim E
richfaa
06 March 2011
09:09 AM
The original post was.

I know diesel owners use an additive in the "colder" areas to prevent jelling, but do you use an additive every fill up?  Once a month, 3 months, year?

What is the reason for adding an additive?  After all doesn't it get everything when it is processed?

It was actually a wide open question and got like responses.

Our homework included the same information as RayIN and then some. We have used the additive since day one.  Information, Research,learning, knowledge, homework are the great equalizers.

pairajays
06 March 2011
09:47 PM
Well, I have done some research but found nothing that substantiates the belief that any additive will increase engine power, cetane rating or engine longevity.  I would appreciate it if you could supply a reference.
Jim E
Don S.
07 March 2011
12:14 PM
Same here.  Sure some additive companies have some "independent" tests done but the independent labs are owned by the snake oil companies that want the testing done.

I haven't been to any engine seminar where either Cat, Detroit, or Cummins will tell you to use a certain additive to improve engine performance or add to the longevity of their products.

How much more life do you want out of an engine?  All of them will run 300,000 without anything other than regular maintenance.

RayIN
07 March 2011
06:37 PM
I have decided Yes, there are additives that-to address algae growth first-does kill algae.  However, once your fuel system is contaminated a thorough cleaning is still necessary.  Cetane improvers, most perform as claimed and improve the rating by 3-7 points.  Two such products are fuel magic,and Standadyne Performance Formula which is what I've decided to begin using.

Cost effective? I don't think so; then again, neither is RVing.

pairajays
08 March 2011
02:13 AM
I don't want to bore other folks on this forum, but you are dodging the point.  Point me to some authoritative article that substantiates your assertion that a fuel additive can improve Cetane rating, engine power or engine longevity?  I agree that an additive can inhibit algae growth if you are in a climate that supports algae.
Jim E
GrayEagle
08 March 2011
09:21 AM
Not sure there is anything to satisfy your request.  If so then it would probably be rejected for some reason.  I use Stanadyne Performance formula at every fill up.  Yes, they do say it increases 'cetane'.  Yes, an independent lab results have shown 9.6% increase in mpg.  My reasons for using are

1. It was recommended by a long time diesel mechanic that took care of my Dad's and then Brother's big rigs.  Very particular and the only additive he recommends.

2. It is the only additive recommended/sold by OEMs.  Specifically, I know Ford does and it is sold under the Motorcraft label.

3. Stanadyne makes injectors, pumps, filters and other related items. I have more faith in their analysis of any fuel system benefits.

I hand calculate my mileage every tank and consistently get from 1.5 to 2 mpg increase.  The variance is related to how fast I am running.  When I either deliberately skip or simply forget the additive my mileage decreases.  That has been the consistent result for several years.  Now none of this is 'authoritative' in sense you are requesting.

'Your mileage may vary'.

pairajays
08 March 2011
10:24 AM
Your probably right.  If you have something that substantiates these claims I would certainly like to read it.  I don't think there is anything, that's why no one has come forth with something.  Additive manufacturers literature would be rejected as would the recommendation by a diesel mechanic.

When you say 'they' do you mean Stanadyne claims an increase in cetane rating?  That certainly does not surprise me, what else could they say?  And where can I read an 'independent lab' report that shows a 9.6% increase in mpg?

I'm not being argumentative just "Show me money", as the saying goes.
Jim E

GrayEagle
08 March 2011
02:38 PM
Yes, you are being argumentative.  If your really interested go to their web site, it may reference the independent lab.  Don't know and don't care.  I will continue to use it, continue to get the mileage increase I have measured, and yes over the same route so as to eliminate grade and road conditions, within a time frame of two weeks with similar weather conditions and at the same speed.  As recently as last November making several trips between Denver, Co and Chanute, Ks.  That is authoritative and independent enough for me.  Which is why I just returned from Diesel Injection Service here in Louisville, KY after purchasing a new supply of their Performance Formula.

Your mileage may vary.

Biker56
08 March 2011
03:40 PM
Pairajays... Did you check the test done in a earlier post?

Here it is (CLICK HERE) a test done by a independent research firm in Texas was hired to do the laboratory work.

I just returned from Diesel Injection Service here in Louisville, KY after purchasing a new supply of their Performance Formula

In the test that "Performance Formula" was rated 12th and very expensive per tank compared to the better ones.
12)Stanadyne Performance Formula
Multi-purpose + anti-gel
cetane improver, demulsified, 5% bio-diesel compatible, alcohol free
HFRR 603, 33 micron improvement
480:1 ratio
6.9 oz./tank
$4.35/tank

richfaa
08 March 2011
03:50 PM
"Well, I have done some research but found nothing that substantiates the belief that any additive will increase engine power, cetane rating or engine longevity. I would appreciate it if you could supply a reference.
Jim E '

Do more research//keep looking.  Links have been provided by others but find others that suite you.

Would this help, probably not as you will not accept anything other than your view.  But do not give up looking..the data is there.

http://en.wikipedia....i/Cetane_number

pairajays
08 March 2011
06:45 PM
OK, a lot of reading and not hard to understand, I think.  The article illustrated that there are some additives that improve lubricity to ULSD.  I did not see where it said these additive improved cetane rating, engine power or longevity.  Did I miss that part or you supposed to understand that increased lubricity will do this?  This is a quote from the article under Content; "These notes were derived from information that was readily available to consumers (via the label and internet information) and none of this information has been evaluated for validity and/or performance. Cetane information has only been noted if the word “cetane” was used in the advertising information.  The words “improves power” has not been translated to mean “improves cetane” in this evaluation."

Have there been very many diesel engines damaged from using ULSD? Just wondering.
Jim E

pairajays
08 March 2011
07:00 PM
OK, I have no argument with that.  I assume you are referring to this line in the Wikipedia article ; "Premium diesel often use additives to improve CN and lubricity, detergents to clean the fuel injectors and minimize carbon deposits, water dispersants, and other additives depending on geographical and seasonal needs."  I believe those additives are already in the diesel when you buy it.  At least all the refiners say so.  You don't have to add more.  Note that is what was said in this article ; http://www.dieselpla...ad.php?t=177728
Jim E
RayIN
08 March 2011
08:04 PM
There is one additive for either gasoline or diesel that works, but it is not engine mfg.. approved.  There are positive test results for using Acetone to improve fuel mileage.  Use at your risk, I will not, when replacing a diesel engine begins at $11,000. I'll stick to commercial products.
Biker56
08 March 2011
08:31 PM

The article illustrated that there are some additives that improve lubricity to ULSD.

You got that part of the Test right.

The purpose of that research was to determine the ability of multiple diesel fuel additives to replace the vital lubricity component in ULSD (Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel) fuel.  No test was done on Cetane improvement.

Have there been very many diesel engines damaged from using ULSD? Just wondering.

ULSD doesn't damage engines unless they are not enough lubricity in it.  And I don't think it has been out long enough to blame it for any engine damage yet. ULSD is not made with lubricity in it.  As it is added in the tanker before delivery.  And not all use the same lubricity or amounts added to it.

And there is the possibility that it may be forgotten at times to add the lubricity.

That is the reason I use Opti-Lube Summer Blend(No added Cetane) Multi-purpose demulsified HFRR 447, 189 micron improvement
3000:1 ratio 1.11 oz./tank $0.68/tank.

That is my choice and yours can be different.  And there is nothing wrong with that.

Remember that old oil maybe filter ad.  You can pay now or later.  It's your choice

GrayEagle
08 March 2011
09:32 PM
For my last comments before moving on;
Increased Cetane in theory gives quicker and more uniform and complete combustion.  Does this increase power and/or mileage?  You be the judge,  I won't argue the semantics.

With the conversion to ULSD the refineries no longer add the additive they once did.  Instead those additives are to be added by the distributor either in their storage tanks or delivery truck's tank.  Do they always add them, and are they consistent with the mixture, I don't know? Believe what you will.

Removal of the sulfur has other ill effects then just the lubricity, as important as this might be. It also effects corrosion and wear throughout the fuel system, along with the effect of water accumulation and such during storage.  Does this have a catastrophic effect initially?  No certainly not, but long term is another story!  I have 94300 miles on my 7.3L.  I plan on another 150000 miles or so before any major work.  I will keep using the Stanadyne Performance Formula.  Other additive may or may not be just as good, I don't know.  The Stanadyne is the only additive I know of which is sold by Ford under the Motorcraft label.  I simply prefer to save several dollars and by mine from local Stanadyne dealers.

RayIN
09 March 2011
10:18 PM
I cannot remember if I've posted this previously or not, so here goes.

There are scientific studies concluding that the most inexpensive lubricity additive is bio-diesel.  As little as B2 (2%) University of Idaho bio-diesel study has a huge impact on wear scar index.  This is why most diesel fuel sold is B2, some B5.  A few stations sell B20 -which BTW, is not mfgr. approved for pre-2010 engines.